Tuesday, August 16, 2016

Still Time For Conservatives To Choose Right: Trump

Here's wishing righty wakes up in time to win with Donald Trump.

Here's longing that anti-Trump conservatives:

1. Recognize their sabotage.

2. Go all in with Donald.

3. Cash in with victory on Nov. 8.

In my mystic musing, an October Surprise has:

Mitt Romney lauding Trump's tax cuts, with businesses' burden dropping to 15% from 35% so they won't leave heavy-handed America for open arms overseas.

Ted Cruz applauding Trump's gun grip, knowing full well the Second Amendment will stay loaded.

Ben Sasse cheering Trump's Supreme Court calls, seeing that top talents Diane Sykes and William Pryor are on the New Yorker's justice list.

Jeb Bush extolling Trump's terror battle, outlined by the 45th president: "My administration will aggressively pursue joint and coalition military operations to crush and destroy ISIS, international cooperation to cut off their funding, expanded intelligence sharing, and cyberwarfare to disrupt and disable their propaganda and recruiting." 

Bill Kristol hailing Trump's Israel loyalty, a lock after the tycoon's recent ISIS speech: "We will work side by side with our friends in the Middle East, including our greatest ally, Israel."

Ben Shapiro commending Trump's balanced-budget contour.

Mark Levin glorifying Trump's Wall, which will halt the exorbitant flood from Mexico and stop crime in its tracks.

John McCain praising Trump's Muslim moat, especially after the GOP nominee underscored that we cannot "let the hateful ideology of radical Islam – its oppression of women, gays, children and nonbelievers – be allowed to reside or spread within" America.

Brent Bozell endorsing Trump's mission to erase ObamaCare in favor of a private plan with low-cost, interstate insurance.

Dana Loesch encouraging Trump's Law & Order toughness amid a country burning like it's 1968.

George Will complimenting Trump's attack on the crummy Veterans Affairs Department.

Thomas Sowell giving Trump an A for targeting Common Core in favor of local school sanity.

Jonah Goldberg exalting Trump's patriotism, spelled out by Donald's defense of America's A-bomb end to WWII: “Do you remember this thing called Pearl Harbor? It turned out we were stronger, meaner and smarter.”

Maybe this is all a pipe dream. Could be the anti-Trump crowd will cut off its nose to spite its smug face no matter how ugly a Hillary presidency looks. No matter how her high court picks and mass-Muslim migration will ruin America.

I hold out hope for an Autumn Awakening. Just as Ben Carson and Chris Christie – unlike Killjoy Kasich – shook off the primary bloodletting to rally around Trump.

In the 1957 flick "The Bridge on the River Kwai," Alec Guinness realizes his treachery in time to blow up the Japanese prize.

"What have I done?" he says before falling on the plunger.

There's time for Romney & Co. to do the same: Stand for what's right, derail Hillary and ride the Trump Train to triumph.

Bucky Fox is an author and editor in Southern California.

     

Friday, August 12, 2016

Ivanka Helps Trump Dig In His Heels

As Donald Trump tears toward the White House, he's wielding stilettos vs. the opposition.


They're worn by Ivanka, the dream daughter who's causing lefty nightmares.


There's her look, so stunning that only Melania trumps her.


There's her name, evoking rock solid and exotic.


There's her biz muscle, lifting tall buildings such as Trump International Hotel in D.C. in time for Donald to live on Pennsylvania Avenue no matter what happens Nov. 8.


There's her motherly acumen, on display at Trump's economic presentation this week in Detroit.


"She is, without question, one of her father's most trusted advisers," says Roger Stone, a Nixon hard charger who has Trump's ear.


Ivanka told Time magazine that her father "raised me to be opinionated. When he asks my opinion, I give it."


Ivanka is 34 and the mother of three. She's married to Jared Kushner, who like Trump turned his dad's real estate firm into a colossus. With Ivanka joining Jared's religion, the White House will finally star a Jewish family. Which makes libs' labeling of Trump a Nazi laughable.


Ivanka was already ahead of the game before her dad ran for president and even before she shone as a Trump Organization exec. Her fashion line clicked with masses of women.


So did her introduction of Trump at the GOP convention. That Cleveland coronation elevated the New York Princess to American Queen.


Regal and projecting, Ivanka hailed Donald for the titan he is: boffo builder, august altruist, phenomenal father.



But anyone plugged in knows that.



Here's where Ivanka hoisted the next president in a light that blinds liberals:



  • "My father values talent. He recognizes real knowledge and skill when he finds it. He is color blind and gender neutral. He hires the best person for the job. Period."
  • "Gender is no longer the factor creating the greatest wage discrepancy. Motherhood is."
  • "As president, my father will change the labor laws that were put in place during a time in which women were not a significant part of the workforce and will focus on making quality childcare affordable and accessible for all." 
  • "American families need relief. Policies that allow women with children to thrive should not be novelties; they should be the norm. Politicians talk about wage equality, but my father has made it a practice at his company throughout his entire career. He will fight for equal pay for equal work, and I will fight for this too, right alongside of him."



Ivanka delivered with such towering conviction and diction, my wife raved. And she's a Bubba-loving Democrat.




Christine Holly Ngo, like Ivanka dressed to win.

Then there's Christine Holly Ngo, a pal of mine whose glam rivals Ivanka's. Now Christine is hardly conservative. She's been on Hollywood red carpets, so you can imagine her true colors. Yet she posted on Facebook: "I'm not getting involved with politics, but I love Ivanka Trump. She is so classy and smart. Graduated from Wharton with honors and has so much drive and ambition. An entrepreneur with 3 kids!!! My new idol."



Meanwhile, cheers came from closer to the action.



California delegate Shawn Steel:  “He does the blue collar, she does the millennials. It’s a powerful combination. This woman, I’ve been saying for some time, is the greatest asset Donald Trump has.”



Breitbart's Julia Pollak: "For millennial women, who are the new generation of moms and workers, balancing everything is hard. And Ivanka spoke directly to me."



It took a month for Trump to again unsheathe his wonderful weapon. This time the venue was Fox, where Greta Van Susteren gave Ivanka a full hour.



The daughter darted through the show with sharp support.


  • Other candidates are "managed by a team of 50 people who are testing and polling every word." As for Trump, "that's not him. That's not the leader he wants to be."
  • The public sees that Trump gets the issues. "He's an unbelievable listener. If he has a question on something, he will pepper people who he believes are smart and informed. ... Ultimately he arrives at his own conclusion."



At the end of the Fox interview, Greta asked her about President Obama's Trump-is-unfit knife job. Ivanka wasn't about to be cut.



"I clearly disagree," she said. "I think he'd be an excellent president."



Such dexterity dressed in glamour that the Liz Warren Dem duds can't match will lead to this:



Donald Trump will be the 45th president.



Ivanka Trump will be a first daughter for the ages.




  • Bucky Fox is an author and editor in Southern California.

Ivanka Helps Trump Dig In His Heels

As Donald Trump tears toward the White House, he's wielding stilettos vs. the opposition.


They're worn by Ivanka, the dream daughter who's causing lefty nightmares.


There's her look, so stunning that only Melania trumps her.


There's her name, evoking rock solid and exotic.


There's her biz muscle, lifting tall buildings such as Trump International Hotel in D.C. in time for Donald to live on Pennsylvania Avenue no matter what happens Nov. 8.


There's her motherly acumen, on display at Trump's economic presentation this week in Detroit.


"She is, without question, one of her father's most trusted advisers," says Roger Stone, a Nixon hard charger who has Trump's ear.


Ivanka told Time magazine that her father "raised me to be opinionated. When he asks my opinion, I give it."


Ivanka is 34 and the mother of three. She's married to Jared Kushner, who like Trump turned his dad's real estate firm into a colossus. With Ivanka joining Jared's religion, the White House will finally star a Jewish family. Which makes libs' labeling of Trump a Nazi laughable.


Ivanka was already ahead of the game before her dad ran for president and even before she shone as a Trump Organization exec. Her fashion line clicked with masses of women.


So did her introduction of Trump at the GOP convention. That Cleveland coronation elevated the New York Princess to American Queen.


Regal and projecting, Ivanka hailed Donald for the titan he is: boffo builder, august altruist, phenomenal father.



But anyone plugged in knows that.



Here's where Ivanka hoisted the next president in a light that blinds liberals:



  • "My father values talent. He recognizes real knowledge and skill when he finds it. He is color blind and gender neutral. He hires the best person for the job. Period."
  • "Gender is no longer the factor creating the greatest wage discrepancy. Motherhood is."
  • "As president, my father will change the labor laws that were put in place during a time in which women were not a significant part of the workforce and will focus on making quality childcare affordable and accessible for all." 
  • "American families need relief. Policies that allow women with children to thrive should not be novelties; they should be the norm. Politicians talk about wage equality, but my father has made it a practice at his company throughout his entire career. He will fight for equal pay for equal work, and I will fight for this too, right alongside of him."



Ivanka delivered with such towering conviction and diction, my wife raved. And she's a Bubba-loving Democrat.




Christine Holly Ngo, like Ivanka dressed to win.

Then there's Christine Holly Ngo, a pal of mine whose glam rivals Ivanka's. Now Christine is hardly conservative. She's been on Hollywood red carpets, so you can imagine her true colors. Yet she posted on Facebook: "I'm not getting involved with politics, but I love Ivanka Trump. She is so classy and smart. Graduated from Wharton with honors and has so much drive and ambition. An entrepreneur with 3 kids!!! My new idol."



Meanwhile, cheers came from closer to the action.



California delegate Shawn Steel:  “He does the blue collar, she does the millennials. It’s a powerful combination. This woman, I’ve been saying for some time, is the greatest asset Donald Trump has.”



Breitbart's Julia Pollak: "For millennial women, who are the new generation of moms and workers, balancing everything is hard. And Ivanka spoke directly to me."



It took a month for Trump to again unsheathe his wonderful weapon. This time the venue was Fox, where Greta Van Susteren gave Ivanka a full hour.



The daughter darted through the show with sharp support.


  • Other candidates are "managed by a team of 50 people who are testing and polling every word." As for Trump, "that's not him. That's not the leader he wants to be."
  • The public sees that Trump gets the issues. "He's an unbelievable listener. If he has a question on something, he will pepper people who he believes are smart and informed. ... Ultimately he arrives at his own conclusion."



At the end of the Fox interview, Greta asked her about President Obama's Trump-is-unfit knife job. Ivanka wasn't about to be cut.



"I clearly disagree," she said. "I think he'd be an excellent president."



Such dexterity dressed in glamour that the Liz Warren Dem duds can't match will lead to this:



Donald Trump will be the 45th president.



Ivanka Trump will be a first daughter for the ages.




  • Bucky Fox is an author and editor in Southern California.

Saturday, May 7, 2016

President Trump, Here We Come

Donald Trump has a fresh moniker: Presumptive Nominee.

He wears it in style, as with his Trump ties and cufflinks. 

Sure beats Trump Just Might Be The Nominee.

Trump fans got tired of that as far back as last summer. Even then they knew he was a lock to head the Republican presidential ticket.

Now with his knockout of Cruz and Kasich, Trump stands alone in the GOP ring.

And when he enters the Oval Office about 250 days hence, he'll get crackin' on Making America Great Again by:

Building the wall. Congress already said OK 10 years ago to the border barricade. Now the Trump Tower Titan will put his talent to work on the demarcation, replete with sending the bill to Mexico. How to make the Mexicans pay? As DonaldJTrump.com details, America will "impound all remittance payments derived from illegal wages; increase fees on all temporary visas issued to Mexican CEOs and diplomats (and if necessary cancel them); increase fees on all border crossing cards – of which we issue about 1 million to Mexican nationals each year (a major source of visa overstays); increase fees on all NAFTA worker visas from Mexico (another major source of overstays); and increase fees at ports of entry to the United States from Mexico."

Dawn Mayo leads Trump cheers in Costa Mesa, Calif.
Braking illegal immigration. Right away, criminal aliens will get tossed and sanctuary cities will draw no more federal bucks. Savings are in the offing, says Trump's site: "Applicants for entry to the United States should be required to certify that they can pay for their own housing, health care and other needs before coming to the U.S." That  should end the outrageous freebie demands of illegals at hospitals and other costly facilities. And drive more punchlines from Twitter's @WriteInTrump parody comic, who wrote, "I love Hispanics so much that when I'm elected I'm going to give millions of them an all expense paid trip to their homeland."

Axing taxes. Businesses will see their payments plummet to 15% from 35%. So they won'tbe tempted to leave heavy-handed America for open arms overseas.

Trashing terror. ISIS will be WASWAS quicker than you can say NO PRISONERS. And the Syrian Trojan Horse trotting to our country will do an about-face. Two million Muslims have already swamped our land since 9/11, with many yearning for berkahs and the rest of Shariah hell. Trump's message: America First, not Worst.

More specifics are coming as we head for Nov. 8. Trump will nail down his points and even miss, as he did the other day in Costa Mesa, Calif., telling us we numbered 31,000 when really the amphitheater held 8,700. But, as he says, these are minor details.

What counts is the vote number on Election Day, leading to the ultimate title: President Trump.
Bucky Fox is an editor and author in Southern California.
Karen Gorske wouldn't let crutches keep her from the Trump rally in Costa Mesa, Calif.

Wednesday, April 27, 2016

Walter Knott, The Pioneer Who Planted Knott's Berry Farm

Walter Knott rode spirit to theme-park heights.

“Success comes as you have confidence in yourself,” he said. “Self-confidence is built by succeeding, even if the success is small. It is the believing that makes it possible. No man succeeds without faith.”

With that faith came boysenberries, roller coasters and a cowboy theme park called Knott’s Berry Farm.

The amusement spot in Buena Park, Calif., just north of Disneyland, boasts 5 million visitors a year, ranking among the top funfair draws in America.

The 160-acre plot — from which its Orange County city thrives with motels and restaurants — originated with a 1920 germination from Walter Knott (1889-1981).

“Walter Knott possessed the persistence that very few people have ever had,” said Jay Jennings, author of “Knott’s Berry Farm: The Early Years,” “He believed that anything was possible if you tried hard enough. That’s why he stayed in the fields and kept farming despite his many early failures in growing vegetables and fruit.

“Knott loved agriculture, turning weed patches into crop-yielding gardens. He learned at an early age (9) how to contribute to the family’s income by selling produce from his crops to railroaders who lived near the Southern Pacific track. Knott’s grandmother Rosamond Dougherty was another big influence. She moved in with his brother, mother and himself and shared exciting stories about her adventures in the Old West, which later motivated Knott to build his Ghost Town at Knott’s Berry Farm.”

The man simply had a “unique combination of having clear goals in mind along with an almost obsessive work ethic,” said Christopher Merritt, co-author of “Knott’s Preserved.” “Even in the face of adversity (i.e., attempting to grow grapes in the Mojave Desert prior to cultivating his farm in Buena Park), he stuck to his overall plan and simply did not give up, when others would have more quickly come to their senses and moved on to other, less daunting prospects.”

Star Power

John Wayne, who had a Knott’s Berry Farm theater named for him, called Knott “a true image of American capitalism. He takes pride in the efforts of his organization and the quality of his product. … I delight in calling him a friend.”

Another actor, Ronald Reagan, took time out from his California governor duties in 1968 to laud Knott as “one of America’s great patriots, one who has successfully climbed to the very top rung of the ladder of success … yet one who has always been careful to see that he left each rung of that ladder in good repair so those who followed would have less trouble in climbing life’s ladder than he had.”

Walter started his rise not far from Buena Park — in San Bernardino, born to Elgin and Virginia Knott.

“Walter Knott overcame many hurdles and hardships,” said Jennings. “First was the death of his father at age 6, which meant that he and his mother couldn’t keep their family farm due to financial hardships. When Knott was a sophomore in high school, the small bit of farmland he and his cousin owned in Coachella Valley was destroyed by a November freeze. Knott moved back to Pomona and worked in the fields all week, then jumped on a train to drop produce off and take orders at various cities on the line. It was grueling but profitable.”

Walter was 21 when he married Cordelia, his bride of six decades and the mother of their four children.

With their Pomona house, life looked nice and easy. Only, Knott wanted a farm, even in the rough California desert. “Think of it: 160 acres of land to call our own if we live on it for three years!”
Cordelia reacted with tears, foreseeing “coyotes, rattlesnakes, no inside plumbing, no running water, not even a house but a humble adobe dwelling,” wrote the biographer Helen Kooiman. “Sand. Hardship. ‘Walter, you can’t mean it!’ ”

He did. “Those desert years were some of the best years of our life. … The hardships we endured made us tough,” said Walter. “After what we went through there, nothing could faze us.”

Finding Traction

By 1920, Walter was moving back to the Los Angeles area — and found his gold mine: Buena Park. He took up his cousin Jim Preston’s offer to join a farming partnership.

“His farming dream was still alive, and Knott leased 20 acres of land along Grand Avenue from William Coughran, which Knott later bought outright,” said Jennings. “This was the land that Knott’s Berry Farm would later be built on.”

Knott made money selling berries at a roadside stand that grew into a building called Knott’s Berry Place in 1928.

Then came Walter’s eureka moment. Discovering Anaheim park chief Rudolph Boysen’s mix of blackberry, loganberry and red raspberry, Knott started growing the boysenberry in 1933.

Depression? What Depression? Knott suddenly had a hot seller in boysenberry pie and jam. With Cordelia weighing in with her chicken specialty, their restaurant boomed.

“Few people who went down the road from Buena Park to the sea could resist the temptation to stop at the Berry Farm, either for a chicken dinner or for the berries,” wrote Norman Nygaard in “Walter Knott: 20th Century Pioneer.”

By 1937, wrote  Kooiman, “waiting lines were so long, he couldn’t see the end.”

This was after a banker turned him down for a loan with a dismissive “highway restaurants fail when they try to expand,” noted Jennings.

Knott found the means, and payroll was about to rocket — from 25 in 1936 to 350 in 1947 to 2,000 in 1972 to 10,000 now.

“My greatest satisfaction in life,” said Knott, “is knowing that some widow, some young person or other human being can come here and find an honest job and win the biggest prize life has to offer — self-respect.”

Those early employees felt Walter’s tenet of goodwill toward customers: “This is more valuable than what we actually sell here on the farm. Goodwill doesn’t develop simply. It develops only through years of integrity, fair dealing and honest toil. We’ve worked hard to develop this, and we want you to help us maintain it.”

Riding High

With the food good, Knott wanted the farm’s entertainment to be even better. So he added amusement to the mix in 1940, sparking Knott’s Berry Place & Ghost Town with a Western theme. In the coming years he littered it with Calico Square, Calico Saloon, Calico Mine Ride and the bandit-thrilling Calico Train, taking the name from a town he had turned into a tourist attraction in San Bernardino County between Buena Park and Las Vegas.

“Walter Knott is credited with many crucial innovations that paved the way for his many successes,” said Jennings. “The first was cutting out the middleman so he could keep more profits from his farming and selling directly to grocers.

Then came the boysenberry, incorporated into punch, jams, jellies and pies at Knott’s Berry Farm for over 80 years.

Yet another successful business venture came from the Chicken Dinner Restaurant that has been serving their world famous chicken for 80 years as well. To accommodate the long lines, Knott built Ghost Town in 1940.

Word of mouth traveled across the country, and within a few years, Knott’s Berry Place (which became Farm in 1947) was one of the most successful amusement parks in the United States and still is to this day.”

Nowadays, Knott’s Berry Farm spotlights six live shows, 18 family rides and 10 roller coasters.
Also in the complex is a rendition of Independence Hall, replete with a 2,000-pound bell, dedicated on July 4, 1966.

Cheers rang in the coming years, especially from Reagan: “He’s been a participant in every worthwhile cause that you can imagine. He has never said no to anything charitable or to anything in the community. We need a couple hundred million more citizens like Walter Knott.”

Reagan became president in 1981, the year Knott died at age 91. His descendants sold Knott’s Berry Farm to Cedar Fair Entertainment for about $250 million in 1997. The parent company, based in Ohio, has seen its stock rocket 900% since 2009, with record net revenue of $1.24 billion in 2015, although it doesn’t publicly break out individual park sales among its 11 amusement sites.

“Walter Knott is indeed an inspirational figure,” said Jennings, “in the sense that he started with very little and through sheer will power and positive thinking (failure was not in his vocabulary) found the farmlands that he needed to grow his fruits and vegetables and then expanded and bought more land as the years progressed and then capitalized on what customers wanted: good food, good preserves and good old fashioned Old West entertainment, which really couldn’t be found anywhere else, at least until Disneyland opened in 1955.

“Walter Knott started as a simple farmer and eventually became the owner of one of the world’s most popular and successful amusement parks. Talk about inspirational.”

Photos Courtesy Jay Jennings

Bucky Fox is an editor and author in Southern California.